Archive for the ‘Chairs’ Category

Salon de Jacob 6pièces

Furniture by Jacob

A distinguished set of furniture in gilded wood, composed of two pairs of armchairs, four side chairs and four sofas.

Period: Louis XVI, circa 1787

Stamp: G.JACOB, Georges Jacob, received as a Master on 4 September 1765.

Labels :

• Salon de Monseigneur, under the apron of the sofas

• Grand Salon, fauteuil courrant à carreau, under the apron of two Armchairs

• Salon de Monseigneur, fauteuil meublant et • Fauteuil meublant du

• Salon de Monseigneur, under the apron of two armchairs

• Chambre à coucher de Monseigneur, under the apron of four chairs.

Provenance: Duc de Choiseul Stainville Marquis de Lamballe

Bibliography:

Pierre Verlet, Le Mobilier Royal Français, Vol. II, N° 36

French Royal Furniture, N° 38, pp. 181-182

Hector Lefuel, Georges Jacob, Ebéniste du XVIII° siècle, p. 161

Revue du Louvre, 1974, n° 3

Sizes :

Armchairs

Height: 95 cm 3 ft 3 1/2 in

Width: 62 cm 2 ft 1/2 in

Depth: 58 cm 1 ft 11 in

Chairs

Height: 92 cm 3 ft 2 in

Width: 55 cm 1 ft 10 in

Depth: 52 cm 1 ft 8 1/2 in

Bergeres

Height: 103 cm 3 ft 4 1/2 in

Width: 105 cm 3 ft 5 1/2 in

Depth: 60 cm 1 ft 11 1/2 in

A pair of cabriolet chairs in wood, sculpted and gilded with beads, egg-and-heart motifs, flutes, acanthus leaves and poppy-heads. The armrests are supported by stiles in the shape of fluted and foliated balusters. They stand on tapered legs adorned with asparagus-shaped stopped flutes. The upper part has an entasis formed by plain leaves. A pair of cabriolet armchairs, sculpted and gilded with beads, and laurel and acanthus leaves. The armrests are supported by stiles in the shape of fluted and foliated balusters. They stand on tapered, stop-fluted legs adorned with asparagus motifs. The upper part has an entasis formed by plain leaves. A set of four flat-back chairs in wood, sculpted and gilded with beads, egg-and-heart motifs and poppy-heads. They stand on tapered and stop-fluted legs. A set of four sofas in wood, sculpted and gilded with acanthus leaves, laurel leaves and egg-and-heart motifs. The flat backs are slightly arched, with two antique urns at the extremities. The armrests end in a crozier. They are supported by stiles in the shape of spiral and foliated balusters. They stand on tapered legs adorned with asparagus-shaped stopped flutes motifs. The upper part has an entasis formed by plain leaves. Georges JACOB (1739-1814), the son of farmers, was born in Cheny, Burgundy, on 6 July 1730. Having lost his parents when he was very young, he moved to Paris at the age of sixteen to learn how to sculpt wood. He served as an apprentice carpenter for the chair carpenter Jean-Baptiste Lerouge in 1756. The latter died the following year but Jacob continued his six-year apprenticeship with the widow of Lerouge. It is in this workshop that he met the journeymen Guillaume Boucault, Pierre Forget and, above all, Louis Delanois, who exerted a strong influence over him. Like Delanois, he specialised in making chairs. He became a Master on 4 September 1765. After establishing himself, he married Jeanne-Germaine Loyer in 1767. Shortly afterwards, they moved to Rue de Cléry in 1775, and then settled permanently in Rue Meslée. They had five children, three sons and two daughters. The eldest, Georges (1768-1803), and the youngest, François-Honoré-Georges (1770-1841), both became brilliant cabinetmakers and assisted their father in the workshop. As of 1781, Georges Jacon was appointed to several functions in the corporations of carpenters-cabinetmakers. He was a supplier to the Court and to Princes. On 13 August 1796, he handed over his business to his two sones. This furniture is very similar to that of the Games Room of the King at the Château of Saint Cloud, made by Georges Jacob, following Order n° 3 of 31 October 1787. “… Order N° 3 of 31 October 1787. Jacob will make for the service of the King in Saint Cloud the carpentry prepared for the sculpture of: 2 sofas, 2 bergeres – 18 armchairs, of which 12 will be meublant* and 6 courant* – 24 chairs, 12 of which will have cushions and 12 will be upholstered, 6 voyeuses*, 5 meublant* chairs, 4 stools of which 2 will be with spurs and 2 id of 15po. out of 12, all upholstered, and 5 po. of seat tops – 1 screen, 1 folding screen of 6 leaves in gilded wood – For the Salon des Jeux du Roy.” National Archives 013290.

The six courant armchairs are mentioned in the memoranda of Georges Jacob: “- – - – - For the Salon des Jeux du Roy: 6 courant armchairs in a new shape also in walnut, the flat surface arched, the backs hollow and cut diagonally, the consoles turned in the shape of balusters, the same profile and same architectural body as the said big armchairs.

For the sculpture:

The backs are adorned with interlaced flowers on the front, threaded beads on the top of the arches, and other beads chiselled around the circumference of the said backs, the assemblages are also decorated with interlaced flowers and plain leaves along the border of the upholstery, the legs are balusters embellished with laurel leaves and threaded seeds, sun-shaped roses in the squares, the consoles are also in balusters enriched with acanthus leaves and laurel leaves and with two tori of ropes, the armrests are decorated with large plain leaves, on the sides are friezes in the pattern of rinceaux with roses in the squares.” National Archives OI 3646 The only difference between the armchairs for the Salon des Jeux and ours is the frieze of interlaced flowers in the case of the former and the frieze of laurel leaves in the case of the latter. The comments by Georges Jacob reveal the precision of his descriptions of the chairs he made for royal commissions. The furniture produced for the Salon des Jeux is various in different private and public collections in France and the United States:

• The Musée Condé in Chantilly

• The Louvre in Paris

• The Metropolitan Museum in New York

• The Museum of Versailles

• The Museum of Boston

The close similarities between the furniture made for the Salon des Jeux in Saint Cloud and our lead us to believe that our pieces were ordered from Georges Jacob by a very eminent personality of the time. One might consider, for example, Monsieur, the brother of Louis XVI, who made considerable orders from Georges Jacob in the 1780s for his various palaces.

* Chaise courant: a chair designed for comfort and easy to move around. Chaise meublant: a chair that is primarily decorative and intended to remain stationary against a wall. Voyeuse: a chair with an upholstered cresting rail at the back, designed to watch card games.


Fauteuil acajou Lion

Lion snouts armchair

Impressive mahogany chair. The high back reclines using bronze handles shaped as lion snouts. The armrests are finished by carved lion heads. The circular rotating seat is adjustable.

It stands on four claw feet.

Period: France, early nineteenth century

This chair has an inscription in ink on the underside of the belt Foliot tapissier rue de Bourbon-Villeneuve. He must be a descendant of Quinibert Nicolas Foliot (who owned two houses in Bourbon Street (now rue d’Aboukir)). In the trade almanac Foliot tapissier is registred in this street between 1823 and 1828.

sizes:
High.         120 cm.             47 1 / 4 in.
Width.       74 cm.               29 in..
Deepth.     64 cm.               25 in..


Fauteuil canné régence

Caned armchair

The wooden frame of this chair is made of solid walnut and exquisitely hand carved rocaille elements, in the centre of the stretchers, on the legs and on the edges of the rails and on the arms.

This chair has a straight back

It is fully-caned

Period: end of Louis XIV

Sizes:

Haut.             105 cm.                3 ft 5 1/3 in.

Larg.                61 cm.                  2 ft.

Prof.               48 cm.                  1 ft  7/8 in.


Fauteuil Sphinge

Armchair with winged sphinxes

An armchair inspired by Antiquity with a high curved back in mahogany and mahogany veneer.

The armrests are supported by two winged sphinxes standing on a rectangular pedestal ending in castors.

Period: late 18th century

Provenance: Former collection of Jean Bloch, sale in Paris, Palais Galliera, 13 June 1961, Lot. 108.

Exhibition: This armchair was included in the exhibition on “French Chairs” held in June-July 1947, n° 186.

Size:

Height – 128 cm 4 ft 2 3/8 in

Width – 66 cm 2 ft 2 in

Depth- 58 cm. 22 7/8 in.

Bibliography:

This armchair is directly inspired by Antiquity. A chair of the same model is depicted in the painting by David at the Louvre, entitled “Lictors Bringing Back to Brutus the Body of His Sons” (Inv. NM 2683), painted for the King in 1789. This painting shows three antique-style chairs that had been ordered and made for David by his cabinet-maker Georges Jacob.

Sophie Monneret “David et le néoclassicisme” Finest SA / Finest Pierre Terrail, p. 92.


Paire de Canapés Heurtaud

Pair of Louis XV corner settees

Pair of grey colored painted corner settees.

Wavy line backrest.

Floral engravings on the top and bottom frame, as well as on the armrest and the undulated feet.

Stamped : N. Heurtaut, Master in 1755.

Period : Louis XV, circa 1760

Provenance : family tradition dictates that it is said to have belonged to Madame du Barry.

Bibliography :

• P. Kjellberg, « Le Mobilier Français du XVIII° Siècle », 1989, p. 404, fig. B (only one settee is shown).

Dimensions:

Large            150 cm            59 in

Depth           115 cm      45 1/2 in


Fauteuil de bureau de Canaba

Desk chair by Canabas

A large desk chair with a rotating seat in mahogany.  The back and seat are caned.

The back and cushion are covered in beige velvet, and the apron is sculpted with flutes.

It stands on four tapering and fluted legs.

Period : Louis XVI.

Stamp: Joseph Gengenbach, known as Canabas, received as Master in April 1766. There are three stamps of Canabas as well as two JME.

Marks: •ASS. NAT. for Assemblée Nationale, fire stamped.

•N°27, with ink twice.

Size :

Height.                  85 cm.         33 1/2 in.

Width.                  57 cm.           22 1/2 in.

Depth.                  56 cm.           22 in.

The furniture of the States General used for the General Assembly frequently bears, in addition to the mark « ASS. NAT. », a four-figure inventory number (drawn up on the initiative of Thierry de Ville d’Avray). This is often for outmoded furniture (Louis XV); on the other hand, our armchair, with its two-figure inventory number, indicates one of the first orders made specially for the National Assembly.  .


Fauteuil de Canabas

Caned armchair by Canabas

Caned chair in mahogany. The armrests are attached to a straight but slightly arched back.  The continuous textured apron is decorated with fluting.

It has a flat leather cushion.

It stands on four tapering and fluted legs (the back ones are oblique)

Period : Louis XVI

Stamp : Joseph Gengenbach, known as Canabas, received as Master on 1st April 1766.

Two similar armchairs, as well as rotating desk chairs, in the same spirit, by Canabas, can be found at the National Assembly.

Size :

Height.                  86 cm.            34 in.

Width.                   52 cm.            20 1/2 in.

Depth.                   46 cm.            18 in.


Paire de Canapés Heurtaud

Pair of Louis XV corner settees

Pair of grey colored painted corner settees.

Wavy line backrest.

Floral engravings on the top and bottom frame, as well as on the armrest and the undulated feet.

Stamped : N. Heurtaut, Master in 1755.

Period : Louis XV, circa 1760

Provenance : family tradition dictates that it is said to have belonged to Madame du Barry.

Bibliography :

• P. Kjellberg, « Le Mobilier Français du XVIII° Siècle », 1989, p. 404, fig. B (only one settee is shown).

Dimensions:

Large 150 cm 59 in

Depth 115 cm 45 1/2 in


8 chaises Emp et Louis-phillipe

Set of eight chairs

A set of eight flat-back chairs from the Empire and Louis-Philippe period, in sculpted and gilded wood, having a rectangular back with a pleated-ribbon decoration, an apron adorned with roses, and sabre legs.

Two chairs are stamped Jacon D.R. Meslée. They were supplied by Georges Jacob and François Honoré Jacob (known as Jacob Desmalter), for the theatre at the Petit Trianon in 1810.

Six chairs are stamped Jacob for Georges-Alphonse Jacob.  They match the above-mentioned chairs and were ordered by Louis-Philippe.

The two chairs stamped Jacob-D-RMeslée  are marked « Trianonspectacle 1810 » in ink with the following numbers:

• PT 1363 (in red ink of the inventory of 1834)

• 5688      (in black ink of the inventory of 1839)

• T 4573 (of the inventory of 1855)

Four chairs stamped Jacob bear the firemark of the Château d’Eu and the two others are marked Dreux.

Size:

The two Empire chairs :

Height 91 cm  36 in

Width 37 cm 14 1/2 in

The six Louis-Philippe chairs

Height 91 cm 36 in

Width 38 cm 15 in

Bibliography:

The invoice of the first two chairs supplied by Jacob-Desmalter and the upholsterer François-Louis CASTELNAUXDARRAC, dated 25 July 1810, is worded as follows :

« 50  chaises en bois d’hêtre mise au couleur d’acajou,

couvertes en velours d’Utrecht bleu à larges raies,

galon faux or et clous dore lentille.  Bois d’une haise

Pour l’appui du pourtour, l’avoir dégarni et regarni plus

fort. Total du premier pourtour; 2,824.82 » (D. Ledoux-

Lebard, Le Petit Trianon, 1989, p. 222)

DARRAC, who died in 1862, was one of the leading upholsterers of the early 19th century.  He carried out many orders for the imperial residences (D. Ledoux-Lebard, Les ébénistes du XIX°, 2nd edition, p. 146).

The Theatre was originally called the Petit Théatre. Marie-Antoinette was responsible for having it built in 1778-1780, like the other houses of her retreat at the Petit Trianon.  The theatre was designed by Richard Micque in the « antique » style.

In 1809, Napoleon decided to renovate the theatre for his second wife, Empress Marie-Louise.  The fabric used by the upholsterer Darac was replaced by one in crimson red.

In 1837, Louis-Philippe renovated the Petit Trianon for his son the Duc d’Orléans, and these chairs seem to have been made at that time and were later transported to the Château d’Eu and the Chapel of Dreux (D. Ledoux-Lebard, op. cit., p. 364).


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